Wine

Introduction:

What are some reasons that have made Windows the first choice for an average user? The abundance of software! Windows operating system has gained huge market share and thus driven software development towards it’s platform. In the recent years, Linux has started to gain good chunks of the market share. Take a look at the graph below, you see how far ahead is Windows in the operating system market.

 

 

While Windows is enjoying the infinite well of software, MacOS and Linux operating systems have started to experience their fair share of progress. As more developers and businesses move towards Ubuntu servers and Apple’s Macbook laptops are dominating the market, demand for higher quality software and software porting (making a piece of software available on another platform) is growing exponentially. The open-source community came up with a software called “Wine”. I will be talking about what Wine is and how you can use it to work across platform at ease.

 

Wine:

Definition: “Wine (recursive backronym for Wine Is Not an Emulator) is a free and open-source compatibility layer that aims to allow computer programs(application software and computer games) developed for Microsoft Windows to run on Unix-like operating systems. Wine also provides a software library, known as Winelib, against which developers can compile Windows applications to help port them to Unix-like systems.”

The idea is that you can run/install software on Linux systems just as easily as you do on Windows. Thanks to wine, Steam has taken up Linux and MacOS into it’s gaming market.

 

Getting Wine:

The following examples will be based on Ubuntu 16.04.

1- Let’s start by opening up the terminal and configuring before installation:

Add 32-bit configuration to make things install without issues.

$: sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

2- Add the Wine Key, Wine Repository & Update Repositories:

$: wget -nc https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/Release.key
$: sudo apt-key add Release.key
$: sudo apt-add-repository https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/
$: sudo apt update

3- Install stable version of Wine:

$: sudo apt-get install wine-stable winehq-stable

4- Run a config file:

WINEARCH=win32 winecfg

5- Install WineTricks for utilities:

$: sudo apt install winetricks

Done! Now you are ready to install and run Windows programs on your Linux machine.

 

Running Your First Program:

Download your Windows program and place it into any directory you wish. Open up terminal and cd to that directory. Once there, to run the .EXE file run the following command:

$: wine name_of_your_program.exe

This will launch the program and you will be able to follow the installation instructions as you would usually on your Windows machine. After the installation is complete you will need to run the program. Some software creates desktop shortcuts which you can double click to run just as you would or some that don’t create a shortcut would require some searching to do.

Programs are usually installed here $: ~./wine/drive_c. You can navigate there and fine your installed program and run it as such $: wine ~./wine/drive_c/MyProgram/game.exe. This will launch your installed game. Now, there is no guarantee your program will run without errors! To make sure before hand your program runs without issues, visit this database to find out from other users how to run it and if it does run at all: WineHQ AppDB

 

Conclusion:

This was a very brief and informal introduction to Wine. Do check out the links below to proceed with Wine and make your application installation process easier.

  • https://askubuntu.com/questions/316025/how-to-install-and-configure-wine
  • https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Wine
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_(software)

I hope you enjoyed this article. Leave a comment down below if there is something you would like to know!

2018-09-06T11:14:09+00:00
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